Nikon Metrology Machine

Metrology is the science of breaking down measurements. Of the activities related to this science, the coordinate-measuring machine (CMM) like the Nikon Metrology Machine is specific to the activity of traceability and sensors.

Using three axes, each one has a scale system that indicates where it is located near the object and then displays these readings in a mathematical form. Arranged orthogonal to each other, the points of the axes can be analyzed by regression algorithms to determine the construction features. The sensors allow exact product dimensions to be measured and later reproduced.

The information provided by a CMM is what machining centers use to calculate the exact dimensions of a product. Without this product specific data, machines would not build with such precision. It is the physical geometrical characteristics of an object recorded by a CMM that allows the standard of replicability of products and one reason machining centers thrive.

Methodology behind traceability is based on the idea that instruments can be redeveloped based on a calculation or set of data regardless of size. Like ratios of ingredients to prepare a given amount of one recipe, the data from CMM should be able to be skewed to replicate the part at any given size. Some examples of this apply especially to the exterior of products. Select parts of aircrafts, ships, and other large machines are often produced in multiple sizes.   When several sizes and identical models exist, precise production of identical sized parts and the ratio between parts directly impacts the function and success of the completed product.

An example of the above can be applied to the select sizes the Nikon Metrology Machine is available in. Each machine can only measure pieces that can fit with its size. Where the Nikon Metrology C3 can measure small parts, and light materials, the larger Nikon Metrology C3 V GP can work on materials such as marine and locomotive equipment.

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Waterjet Cutting

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Waterjet cutting is a process capable of cutting nearly anything using highly pressurized water. Using the high-pressure waterjets, or a combination of water and an abrasive substance – this water can cut through food, glass, metal, and much more.  A waterjet using abrasive substances is sometimes also known as an abrasive jet. Examples include the OMAX Abrasive Waterjet Systems.  A waterjet without the use of abrasives is used to cut softer materials and is typically called pure waterjet, or water-cutting only.

Amongst the variety of precision machine tools, waterjet cutting is known as the preferred method for fabrication of many machine parts. From 5-axis water cutting machines, to the more basic operating style, materials such as metal and glass are often cut with waterjets because of their precision and efficiency doing so. However, not everything can be cut with a waterjet. Diamonds and tempered glass are two known materials that cannot be cut with a waterjet. Diamonds are too hard, and tempered glass will shatter.

Beside the waterjet’s ability to cut most material, the machine can be programmed using the CAD system to draw out the part. The machine then adjusts the stream, pressure, and movement based on the information it receives and begins cutting.

Request an OMAX machine demo or contact Brooks Machinery to learn more about various machine lines.

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Milling Machine, the machine center

What’s the most versatile machining tool? If you answered: milling machine or mill, you’re correct. Though it’s not the only machine with a long list of capabilities, it’s ranked pretty high and can confidently be said to have initiated the machining industry. It is fast, efficient, and can produce all sizes and shapes with precision.

Simplified breakdown of the milling machine: a machine that holds and feeds material through a rotating cutter to produce a desired shape.

There are several classifications and methods of milling which are based on the placement of the axis and the location of the spindle and cutter attached to it. These include:

Classification:

  • Peripheral: The cutter is mounted on an axis that is parallel to the work piece surface to be machined. The milled surfaced is a result of the teeth located on the periphery of the cutter body.
  • Face milling: The cutter is mounted on an axis which rotates perpendicular to the work piece surface. The milled surface is the result of the cutting edges located on the periphery of the face of the cutter.
  • End milling: The cutter is mounted on an axis that is vertical to the work piece. The cutting teeth are found on both the end face and the periphery of the cutter body.

Methods:

  • Up milling: Direction of the cutter rotates in the opposite direction of the feed. Example, the cutter rotates clockwise, while the material is fed to the right. Hence, material is moving up the opposite way of the rotation.
  • Down milling: The cutter rotation and feed move in the same direction. Hence, the material moves down in the same direction as the cutter.

Milling machines have come a long way since their debut over one hundred years ago. With the advancements in technology, CNC, or computer controlled milling machines have the ability to produce more in less time, with less manual work. From switching out tools on its own, to controlling the speed and shape of multiple rotating axis, the milling machine has become a machining center. Every day different ideas are proposed and implemented to maintain the machining center’s ability to evolve with, and shape the world around us.

With so many functions, machining centers can be categorized further and named based on the application it was built to perform best.

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The CAM/CAD component

What exactly is CAM and CAD? Broken down, CAM translates to “computer-aided manufacturing” and CAD to “computer-aided design”; computer software that guides the processes of a machine. These terms are laden in manufacturing jargon, and if not alluded to, specifically required for most machining products. Most inventions throughout history have had one common motive: to make life easier. Often that means: to eliminate the human component. While machinery has taken over some of the manual work, the advancements of CAD and CAM have increased the need for highly skilled and specialized professionals that resemble computer engineers more than machinists of the past.

Partnership with Delcam (a leading supplier of CAD/CAM software) was a natural extension to the Brooks’ business as their mission to maintain the highest quality equipment, technical proficiency, and commitment to customer service. As a distributor of Delcam’s PartMaker, Brooks ensures that the products are available to fill your machine manufacturing requests.

Delcam’s Partmaker compliments several machine tools offered by Brooks including the full line of machines from Hurco, Ganesh, Nomura, and Willemin-Macodel. Additionally PartMaker holds two U.S. patents on its technology for automating the programming of the multi-axis Turn-Mill Centers and Swiss-type lathes.  They have also actively supported post processors for virtually every CNC machine built over the past 20 years and offer a variety of specialist CAM applications to fit the various niches of your advanced manufacturing needs.

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Direction of Manufacturing: Trends

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Up until the turn of the century, manufacturing used to be a highly labor-intensive process, but has developed into a sophisticated set of information-technology-intensive processes; what were once vague trends and systems are now converged, more complex trends. Large scale trends are currently growing globally, and are leading a new set of standards when it comes to advanced manufacturing. Some of the current trends are:

Information Technology: consists of programs like digital control systems, computer-aided design (CAD), and sensing programs; this allows for overall productivity raises in communication, speed, and efficiency; connects links of individual components to larger assembly systems.

Dependence on Modeling and Simulation: gives engineers the capacity to design models from an idea all the way to production; with simulations, designs are optimized well before production starts to test the limits and functionality of longevity before merchandise hits the production line.

Supply-Chain Management: being able to manage all aspects of a product from production to transportation security; this includes reducing time to fulfill orders and services for consumers.

Changeability of Manufacturing Based Upon Customer Needs: configurability, flexibility, transformability, and agility are the foundations of a business, from store-level all the way up to the company as a whole; ongoing changes distinguish one company from another and allow particular pros to be leading factors.

Sustainable Manufacturing: sustainability targets every aspect of a business; changes have to be economically beneficial, financially responsible, and environmentally-safe; this includes energy and water intake, consumption of materials, and reprocessing of conventional processes.

These models are the current leaders towards a new age, and with it comes the overthrowing of old concepts which can no longer apply to the mindsets of how companies function.

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Machinery: Mining Innovation

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The effects of the mining boom have substantially increased mining standards across the world. It lead to lower unemployment, higher supply needs and demands, and better conditions for workers. This led to an increase in the mine-to-market chain system, allowing for private and government sectors projects to continually build on themselves, while limiting environmental and social deconstruction of mining sites.
As we move out of the mining boom, the next few years of metal mining, coal mining and mineral mining is expected to see promising growth in all markets. Also with ongoing technological advancement in efficiency, productivity and innovation, developing countries will continue to improve their economies while diversifying their range of products.
Brooks Machinery has been supplying the machines for building mining equipment for many years. Contact us for more information.

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Nikon Metrology

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Imagine the combustion engine of an Audi R8 Spyder 5.2 FSI Quattro. From the exhaust manifold to the connecting rod holding the crankshaft in place, every piece has to be intricately built. Before the invention of digital cross scanners, the manufacturing of cars had to be done solely by hand. But now, with advancements in 3-D Metrology, time-consuming activities such as automotive component inspections have become perfected.

With the ability to have fully automated scanning and inspection, Coordinate Measuring Machines (CMM) have revolutionized the capture of complex features and surfaces. CMMs have redefined areas of study such as biology, human anatomy, anthropology, and even infrastructure.

Examples of Coordinate Measuring Machines in Modern Companies;
• LC15Dx: High resolution, high accuracy scanner for smaller field of view, suited for compact or detailed objects
• XC65Dx(-LS): Digital cross scanner that captures all 3D details of features, edges, pockets, ribs and freeform surfaces
• K-Scan MMD: Walk-around scanner for portable application in larger work volume
• MCAx – Manual CMM Arm: Portable 7-axis measuring system built for high accuracy, and utilizing Wi-Fi data transmission
• MMDx/MMC: Handheld scanner for ultra-productive scanning and one-click analysis

With Nikon’s ongoing advancements in tactical and non-contact CMMs, their continued use of 3-D metrology will gradually build, generating more demand for their use.

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